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What is the definition of The Emperor’s Children 2024?

What is the definition of The Emperor's Children 2024?

What is the definition of The Emperor’s Children 2024?

The number of children an emperor’s consort could have varied depending on several factors, including the specific culture, period, and personal circumstances. In historical contexts, emperors and their consorts often sought to produce heirs to ensure the succession of the imperial line. As a result, the number of children could be substantial.

How many children could an emperor’s consort have?

In some cases, an emperor’s consort might have multiple children, particularly sons, to secure the dynasty’s future. In certain cultures, such as ancient China, having sons was highly valued for carrying on the family name and inheriting the throne. Emperors often had multiple consorts to increase the chances of producing male heirs, which could result in many children from different consorts.

However, it’s important to note that the number of children an emperor’s consort had was not always solely determined by the Emperor’s desires. Factors like fertility, health, and individual circumstances also play a role. Additionally, the number of children could be influenced by societal expectations and cultural norms.

Overall, the exact number of children an emperor’s consort could have varied widely depending on various factors, and there is no specific or fixed number associated with the role.

What happens when an emperor has no children?

Usually, the next in line would drop to the closest relative of the Emperor, like his brother or cousin. If the Emperor doesn’t have any kin, then the next Emperor would be chosen from relatives of the previous Emperor, and so on. However, this would often lead to protests and violence from different factions, so it’s often best for the Emperor to have children to pass the throne to.

Are the Emperor’s Children still a playable faction?

I play Emperor’s Children in both the Horus Heresy and 40k versions of the game, so… yeah, they are a playable faction.

Of course, when they say “playable,” some gamers are actually referring to whether or not they wreck face as an ultra-competitive tournament list. If that’s what you’re referring to, then my answer is.. probably not much.

I’m no tournament player by any means, but from what I’ve heard through the grapevine, Iron Hands Primaris and Tau are tearing it up on top tables; I haven’t heard that ECs have been doing the same.

That said, I do well with them in the friendly, narrative-type games I play. They pump out a lot – a lot – of firepower and also hit hard in close combat. New rules for Emperor’s Children recently came out in the Psychic Awakening: Faith and Fury supplement, which gives them additional flavorful options.

What is the definition of The Emperor’s Children?

The definition of the Emperor’s children is any progeny conceived as a result of the Emperor having sexual intercourse with his sex partners.

Who is the Emperor’s niece?

Is it the one with the new clothes you’re asking about, or is it the international DJ Emperor Rosko, now based in the US, whose family you’re enquiring about?

Do people think that the Emperor was a bad parent to his children (primarchs)? If so, why?

Yes, many people in the Warhammer 40k universe believe that the Emperor was a bad parent to his children, the Primarchs. This is because the Emperor created the Primarchs in secret and then scattered them across the galaxy, leaving them to be raised by others. The Primarchs were also genetically engineered to embody specific traits, which often led to conflict between them. Additionally, the Emperor was often absent and focused on his own goals, leaving the Primarchs to fend for themselves. This lack of guidance and support from their father figure ultimately led to the downfall of many of the Primarchs and the fracturing of the Imperium.

Do people think that the Emperor was a bad parent to his children (primarchs)? If so, why?

Primarily because the Emperor never considered them to be His children. That was some poetic bullshit; the Emperor made them to be his generals and to lead the forces forged from their genetics to victory while he conquered the Webway back on Terra.

The problem was the Primarchs were never born and raised the way the Emperor had planned. They were whisked away to various hellhole worlds where they fought and killed their way to the top of the world’s hierarchies. The Emperor could not monitor them for corruption; they all just lived the lives they lived and got the mental trauma they got from that. It is this mental trauma that is the root cause of so much of the Heresy, exploited by the mind and reality-warping powers of Chaos. I actually believe the Emperor held off on the Webway project as long as he did because he needed to make sure the Primarchs could be trusted to do their jobs, not because he needed to be involved in a war against Orkz, no matter how big the boss was.

The Primarchs sadly DID need a parental figure; they were a soul crafted out of some Warp entity, a being of emotion bound into a demigod-like physical form based on human genetics, not just soulless killing machines; they felt very deeply, too. A lot of them had parental figures that led them terribly astray, while many others suffered trauma after trauma with no one else to care for them. If the Emperor had seen them more as people than tools, everything could have been avoided altogether. But only He knew what they truly were, and I think a part of Him hated them because of that.

Exactly how did the Emperor come back?

Palpatine was falling down the reactor shaft in RotJ when a box-like object shimmered into existence below him in his path. As it solidified, his descent slowed, and ultimately he found himself coming to a stop inside this “mystery box,” which was then sucked out through a ventilation shaft and emerged from the hull of the Death Star moments before its reactor core exploded.

The blast pushed this “mystery box” into a hitherto unknown and unexplored “hyperspace anomaly,” which apparently had gone unnoticed in the Endor System. The stars seemed to stretch into infinity until the “mystery box” was finally traveling at .7 past lightspeed, setting a new speed record as it tumbled away with its shriveled, Force lightning-scarred passenger.

This “mystery box” emerged from hyperspace in the Outer Rim and tumbled out of control until captured by the gravitational field of the planet Exogol, the long-lost home planet of the Sith, which Palpatine had been searching for his entire life.

Once on the surface, the “mystery box” suddenly faded away, never to be seen or heard of again. It was not even questioned by the relieved Palpatine or the Sith cultists who witnessed its miraculous arrival. The cultists rushed the critically injured Sith Lord into their primitive yet highly mystical medical ward and saved him by plugging him into an elaborate life support unit.

What would happen if the Emperor needed to be a better guy?

When was he ever a good guy, especially after he became Emperor? Palpatine was always evil. And, unlike Vader, he reveled in it. Just watch how he treats Luke in ‘Jedi’ and how he dismisses Vader as no longer important because he’s gotten his hands on Luke. Remember, he was a SITH.

What is the Emperor’s opinion of psykers?

Powerful but dangerous, like him, but most Psykers don’t possess the incredible control of their powers or the knowledge to practice extreme caution when using their powers, should they use them at all. He almost certainly recognized the use of them, but he also recognized that humanity, for the most part, wasn’t ready for the power. This is an evolutionary thing that, if the Emperor’s grand plan came to fruition, would’ve resulted in humans becoming something akin to Eldar as a race of psychic beings with physical and mental abilities far superior to what most are capable of in the current setting.

His understanding, however, meant he needed to figure out what to do with them. That’s right, the Big E was unsure of what to do for once, so he called the Council of Nikae 40k edition to discuss it. The psyker question was a big sticking point for several primaries and even resulted in friction between them.

Magnus was a major pro-poker for obvious reasons, but he ultimately lost the case, resulting in the Emperor passing the Edicts, which heavily restricted players and disbanded the Libraries. It was also a trial, and he got told off for sorcery.

By told off, I mean he was told if he did it again, then there’d be three lost Primarchs (the fact the Big E didn’t just say that is a missed opportunity)

What is the definition of an Emperor? Can someone be an Emperor without ruling anything?

An emperor is a monarch who rules over an empire, which is a sovereign state consisting of multiple territories or nations. Typically, an emperor has supreme power and authority over their subjects, and their rule is often characterized by grandeur, ceremony, and imperial pomp.

The title of Emperor has been used throughout history by various rulers, including those of ancient Rome, China, Japan, and the Byzantine Empire, as well as more modern empires such as the British Empire.

While the traditional definition of an emperor includes ruling over an empire, there have been cases where the title has been used as an honorary or ceremonial position without any real political power. For example, in modern times, the Emperor of Japan is a largely symbolic figurehead with no executive or legislative authority. It serves mainly as a symbol of national unity and continuity.

Therefore, someone can hold the title of Emperor without ruling anything, but traditionally, an emperor is associated with holding supreme power over an empire or significant territory.

What is the definition of an Emperor? Can someone be an Emperor without ruling anything?

1. Which Emperor had the most kids?

This guy

Genghis Khan fathered hundreds of children with his wives and 500 concubines!

Today, as many as 1 in 12 Asians and 1 in 200 globally are believed to be his descendants.

The ultimate conqueror and the ultimate family guy!

“It’s pretty clear what they were doing when they were not fighting.”

Just for knowledge sharing

It’s far tough to say for sure which Emperor had the most children, as there had been many emperors at some stage in history, and facts about their offspring may need to be completed or reliable. However, a few emperors are regarded for having a massive range of children:

Emperor Augustus of Rome is said to have fathered at least 14 children with his diverse wives and mistresses.

Emperor Genghis Khan of the Mongol Empire is thought to have had hundreds of kids, even though the exact wide variety isn’t known.

Emperor Kangxi of the Qing Dynasty in China is stated to have had at least 35 sons and numerous daughters, along with his various other halves and concubines.

Emperor Shah Jahan of the Mughal Empire in India is assumed to have had at least 14 children together with his spouse, Mumtaz Mahal, inclusive of several who went directly to become emperors themselves.

It should be referred to, however, that the number of kids an emperor had turned into was frequently visible as a symbol of their strength and virility. So, there may have been some exaggeration or embellishment of the historical data.

What is the definition of the Emperor’s power?

Roman Emperor, you mean? It isn’t what you’re expecting.

First of all, ‘Emperor’ is not a title or office they ever used. The reason is because that would make them a monarch, almost a dirty word to Roman elites. When we see King, we mean some dotty old ruler whose daughter is about to be married off to some handsome dragon-killing knight. What the Romans meant was tyrant, pure and simple.

The Roman Republic was a concept, not a regime. It was about free will and self-determination, a state where those with privilege care for those without. That’s a little romantic, of course, but it was the underlying concept.

Augustus did not become Emperor. He became Princeps Senatus (First Senator, his day job). He was given extra honors like Pater Patriae (Father of the Nation) and privileges like tribunician power (he could veto any decision that would harm the interests of the public). Most importantly, he retained military control.

To command someone else in Roman society was to treat them like a slave unless they had the Right to do so. Men licensed to lead armies were given imperium, a Right to Command Armies. Usually, this was imperium consulare. But Augustus received imperium major, the supreme Right to Command, and also held the Right to intervene militarily anywhere in the empire. Thus, he had the strongest hand in political play since he could take command of any army in Rome.

To rule, as an emperor might, meant to command Roman citizens. This was strictly speaking tyranny, but the Republic felt it was worth keeping a special office for emergencies called Dictator, which gave the holder the Right to command any citizen for six months or until the emergency was over, whichever was the shorter. Julius Caesar got himself awarded Dictator Perpetuo, the only Roman to hold that Right to command citizens permanently – and that was why he was killed, because he was, in effect, a self-professed tyrant. Augustus refused a dictatorship no matter what the pressure. He would not rule citizens in the Roman Empire.

Augustus had created a template for a dominant magisterial leadership in Rome. Future leaders were emulating him, securing military overlordship and getting acceptance from the Senate, the source of traditional authority, which allowed the dominant Roman the privileges needed to run the Roman government. Not the people; they were free to do as they pleased as long as they obeyed the law and paid taxes. But later, Diocletian declared his word was law, and so people had to obey Roman leaders legally from that point onward.

The favorite title of the Roman leaders was Imperator. It meant ‘victorious general’ and was a spontaneous honor handed out by soldiers to successful generals. Augustus used it as part of his name to remind everyone he was a war hero, and since Romans loved military glory, when they emulated Augustus, they also took the same name. So, over time, Imperator was seen as a label of office even though it actually meant nothing of the sort. So that’s why we translate Imperator as Emperor today and why Augustus was posthumously re-evaluated as an Emperor when he was no more than the most powerful magistrate in Rome.

The essential point is that being the Imperator of Rome meant the Senate accepted your claim to power and awarded you the privileges you needed to emulate Augustus. You became a military dictator with civil privileges in a constitutional republic.

Why did the Emperor create Daimyos?

He arrived at the same conclusions as the ancient Persians. Centralization of power combined with the decentralization of administration. But almost everyone arrived at that conclusion sooner or later.

Do you consider the kid who shouted ‘the emperor has no clothes’ to be foolish?

Not at all. I consider that child to be simply a child, which is the whole point of it. The adults don’t dare say anything – it took someone outside the “system” to call out what is clearly wrong. This part of the story is wise on multiple levels.

Do you consider the kid who shouted ‘the emperor has no clothes’ to be foolish?

Perceptive, not foolish.

For those that are unfamiliar, The Emperor’s New Clothes is a story by Hans Christian Andersen of a ruler who is fooled into getting fine garments made for him that are, in fact, invisible.

And by invisible, I mean non-existent. The creators of the “invisible” clothing tell the king that the clothes that were made for him are invisible only to those who are daft and unintelligent. In reality, the only daft and unintelligent person ended up being the Emperor. Everyone in the town made sure to act as if the Emperor was wearing some nice new clothes so as not to seem foolish or offensive. The child, being the only person who unwittingly called a spade a spade.

The kid was smart enough to see through the absolute stupidity that the townsfolk continued to perpetuate and unconditioned by the world around him, allowing him to speak the truth when so many others would not.

… You know, we can all learn something from that kid. In a world drowning in B.S. and false claims, we all should really make it a point to let our leadership know when they are dumb, even if we happen to agree with said leadership most of the time.

How common is it for an emperor to have no children? What happens when an emperor has no children, and how do they deal with succession issues?

It is not uncommon for an emperor or monarch to have no children, as fertility issues, early death, or other factors can prevent the birth of heirs. When an emperor has no children, succession issues become a concern, as there may be no clear line of succession, and potential contenders for the throne may emerge.

In many cases, an emperor who has no children will seek to designate an heir through various means, such as adoption, marriage alliances, or designating a successor from among his close relatives or loyal supporters. This process can be complex and may involve political maneuvering, as different factions or individuals may have competing interests and agendas.

If an emperor dies without a clear heir or succession plan, the situation can become more complicated and may lead to instability or conflict. In such cases, various individuals or groups may seek to claim the throne, leading to succession struggles or even civil wars.

Historically, different cultures and societies have developed various systems and traditions for dealing with succession issues, such as primogeniture (the practice of passing the throne to the eldest son), elective monarchy (where a council or other group chooses the ruler), or other forms of inheritance or appointment. These systems have evolved and have varied widely across different regions and periods.

Can the Emperor have a child?

Emperor’s Fertility Status

Can the Emperor have a child?

It depends on which Emperor you are referring to, as there have been many Emperors throughout history across various cultures and countries.

In general, if an Emperor is a male human being, then biologically speaking, he is capable of fathering a child. However, there may be certain factors that could affect his ability to have children, such as age, health, or fertility issues. Additionally, there may be cultural or societal factors that impact whether an Emperor is permitted to have children or not, such as rules around succession or expectations around marital status.

It’s also worth noting that in some cases, an Emperor may not be able to have a child due to a physical or medical condition. For example, Emperor Akihito of Japan reportedly underwent surgery for prostate cancer in 2003, which could have potentially impacted his fertility.

Ultimately, the ability of an Emperor to have a child will depend on a variety of individual and cultural factors.

How does the Emperor get around?

Which Emperor? Do you know any? Are you speaking of the Emperor of Japan? He is the only one most people are aware of in our modern world.

What is the definition of The Emperor’s Children?

The Emperor’s Children, also sometimes known after their fall as the Lords of Profligacy, are a Traitor Legion of Chaos Space Marines who devote themselves solely to the service of the Chaos God Slaanesh, the Prince of Pleasure. However, they were originally the Imperium of Man’s proud Third Legion of Astartes.

How did the Emperor know that his sons were successful?

An emperor or any parent would know if their sons were successful through various means, such as:

  1. Communication: The Emperor could have regular communication with his sons, either in person or through letters, to keep track of their progress and achievements.
  2. Reports from others: The Emperor could receive reports from trusted advisors or officials about the successes and accomplishments of his sons.
  3. Observations: The Emperor could personally observe his sons’ actions and accomplishments, either in person or through accounts from others.
  4. Public recognition: If the Emperor’s sons were successful in their endeavors, they might receive public recognition or accolades, which would be reported back to the Emperor.

Ultimately, the specific way the Emperor would know about his son’s success would depend on the context and the particular situation.

What is the definition of The Emperor’s Children?

The Emperor’s Children are a Legion of precise and elegant elites laden with honors earned from the Imperium’s highest echelons. The III Legion seeks glory on the battlefield, leveraging acute planning and fluid martial excellence to achieve victory over enemy forces many times their size.

What is the Emperor’s Children’s relationship with the Emperor?

The Emperor’s Children were one of the most favored Space Marine Legions of the Emperor of Mankind. They were known for their dedication to perfection and their love of excess. The Emperor was proud of their achievements and accomplishments, and he bestowed upon them the Palatine Aquila, his icon, as a symbol of their martial perfection.

However, during the Horus Heresy, the Emperor’s Children fell to Chaos and became corrupted by the powers of the Warp. They were led by their Primarch, Fulgrim, who was seduced by the daemonic sword Laer. The Emperor’s Children became obsessed with perfection, but their definition of perfection became twisted and warped. They came to see pain and suffering as a form of beauty, and they reveled in the infliction of cruelty.

The Emperor’s Children fought alongside the other Traitor Legions during the Horus Heresy, and they played a major role in the Fall of the Imperium. After the Heresy, the Emperor’s Children were scattered across the galaxy, and they became a band of roving pirates and raiders. They are still a force to be reckoned with, and they are still driven by their desire for perfection, even if their definition of perfection is now twisted and corrupted.

In the current 41st Millennium, the Emperor’s Children are one of the most feared and hated Chaos Space Marine Legions. They are known for their mastery of the art of war, their sadistic cruelty, and their twisted sense of beauty. They are a constant threat to the Imperium, and they will stop at nothing to achieve their goals.

Who was Emperor Palpatine’s son?

Emperor Palpatine had no son, but his clone was considered his son.

Palpatine did have a successful clone that did not have any of the debilitating aspects of his other clones, and yet this clone had no force, sensitivity, or powers.

The clone offshoot, not quite identical in appearance to the Dark Lord of the Sith, survived. Thriving, the clone boy was healthy and was regarded to be the Emperor’s son.

The young man’s name, as well as the reason he survived, by neglect or purpose, were lost to history.

Palpatine was disgusted by this clone because of this but did not kill him either. Palpatine’s clone met a woman, and the two of them sired a child: Rey.

I hope that clears up any confusion!

I ❤️C2, questions, disagreements, curses, and hexes!

-Jason

What is the main character’s name in The Emperor’s Children?


The main characters in “The Emperor’s Children” by Claire Messud are three friends: Marina Thwaite, Danielle Minkoff, and Julius Clarke. Marina Thwaite is often considered the central character, as the novel revolves around her and her relationships with the other characters.

Who are the Emperor’s Children Primarchs? Why was Fulgrim so special?

<calm tone>

(Note: Because I’m Angron, prepare for this answer to be incredibly biased.)

The Primarch of the Emperor’s Children is full. Now, the fulcrum is special in the way that he is a massive baby who had literally no reason to turn a traitor because he was somewhat likable before the Laer Blade. Still, out of all people, he put Fabius Bile as his Chief Apothecary, which is already a war crime.

Now, what he did was that he was so overzealous on his Laer campaign that he didn’t listen to some commanders, picked up an obviously suspicious sword, and decided to keep it. He thought that the voice that he was hearing was his mind, but now, it was a Daemon of Slaanesh.

He was also special in the way that he killed Ferrus Manus, his best friend, broke free of the Daemon controlling him, and still stayed a traitor.

I’m going to put an image of Ferrus fighting Fulgrim.

Who are the Emperor’s Children Primarchs? Why was Fulgrim so special?

The Emperor’s Children Legion was the III Legion of the Imperium of Man. Once the most loyal of Legions, they are now the most debased of traitors.

During the Great Crusade, Pre-Fulgrim, they were heavily favored by him. In fact, they alone earned the right to wear the Imperial Aquila for actions saving the Emperor’s very life in the world of Proxima. Unfortunately, their gene-seed was sabotaged.

This sabotage was called the Blight and soon reduced the whole Legion from thousands to a meager 200. Their numbers only slowly rose again after the rediscovery of their Primarch, Fulgrim.

Fulgrim is a perfectionist. A master smith master swordsman has unusually high regeneration and can charm just about anyone. His presence screams of nobility, and his Legion easily reflected his persona. It wasn’t enough to be good; they had to be PERFECT. To master their duties and everything else to the highest possible degree.

His attitude and hunger for perfection led several of his brothers to see him as a preening peacock. An arrogant snob. Never mind, he and his Legion accomplished tasks that would take multiple Legions or a greater amount of assets.

Fulgrim would, unfortunately, be corrupted by the Laer Blade. An artifact with a greater daemon of Slaanesh. After accomplishing yet another impressive victory against a foe that should have taken far more than what was utilized, the Primarch discovered it in the Xenos temple and took it with him.

The blade whispered to him, played on his emotions and memories, and drove him toward excess. His Legion began taking combat drugs, carrying out perverse experiments, and enjoying ever more debauched activities. The result of all this was when Horus approached Fulgrim to join the rebellion, he did so willingly.

Fulgrim fell into misery after killing his brother Ferrus at Istvaan. He allowed himself to be possessed by the Daemon in his sword but later, somehow, broke free. (Honestly, I hate that piece of lore; I like painting Fulgrim more). In the end, the Lord became an annoying liability for the traitors, frequently attacking worlds to turn the populace into drugs or other horrific things.

The 3rd quit the siege alongside their Primarch and spent their time largely raising Imperial space. Fulgrim hasn’t done anything up till the opening of the Great Rift, and the Lord has done little of military significance. They are passionate monsters. Everything is done for their pleasure and enjoyment, nothing else.

Are the Emperor’s Children still a playable faction?

I play Emperor’s Children in both the Horus Heresy and 40k versions of the game, so… yeah, they are a playable faction.

Of course, when they say “playable,” some gamers are actually referring to whether or not they wreck face as an ultra-competitive tournament list. If that’s what you’re referring to, then my answer is.. probably not much.

I’m no tournament player by any means, but from what I’ve heard through the grapevine, Iron Hands Primaris and Tau are tearing it up on top tables; I haven’t heard that ECs have been doing the same.

That said, I do pretty darned well with them in the friendly, narrative-type games I play. They pump out a lot – a lot – of firepower and also hit hard in close combat. New rules for Emperor’s Children recently came out in the Psychic Awakening: Faith and Fury supplement, which gives them additional flavorful options.

What is the main character’s name in The Emperor’s Children?

Who are the Emperor’s Children Primarchs? Why was Fulgrim so special?

<calm tone>

(Note: Because I’m Angron, prepare for this answer to be incredibly biased.)

The Primarch of the Emperor’s Children is full. Now, the fulcrum is special in the way that he is a massive baby who had literally no reason to turn a traitor because he was somewhat likable before the Laer Blade. Still, out of all people, he put Fabius Bile as his Chief Apothecary, which is already a war crime.

Now, what he did was that he was so overzealous on his Laer campaign that he didn’t listen to some commanders, picked up an obviously suspicious sword, and decided to keep it. He thought that the voice that he was hearing was his mind, but now, it was a Daemon of Slaanesh.

He was also special in the way that he killed Ferrus Manus, his best friend, broke free of the Daemon controlling him, and still stayed a traitor.

I’m going to put an image of Ferrus fighting Fulgrim.

Who are the Emperor’s Children Primarchs? Why was Fulgrim so special?

The Emperor’s Children Legion was the III Legion of the Imperium of Man. Once the most loyal of Legions, they are now the most debased of traitors.

During the Great Crusade, Pre-Fulgrim, they were heavily favored by him. In fact, they alone earned the right to wear the Imperial Aquila for actions saving the Emperor’s very life in the world of Proxima. Unfortunately, their gene-seed was sabotaged.

This sabotage was called the Blight and soon reduced the whole Legion from thousands to a meager 200. Their numbers only slowly rose again after the rediscovery of their Primarch, Fulgrim.

Fulgrim is a perfectionist. A master smith master swordsman has unusually high regeneration and can charm just about anyone. His presence screams of nobility, and his Legion easily reflected his persona. It wasn’t enough to be good; they had to be PERFECT. To master their duties and everything else to the highest possible degree.

His attitude and hunger for perfection led several of his brothers to see him as a preening peacock. An arrogant snob. Never mind, he and his Legion accomplished tasks that would take multiple Legions or a greater amount of assets.

Fulgrim would, unfortunately, be corrupted by the Laer Blade. An artifact with a greater daemon of Slaanesh. After accomplishing yet another impressive victory against a foe that should have taken far more than what was utilized, the Primarch discovered it in the Xenos temple and took it with him.

The blade whispered to him, played on his emotions and memories, and drove him toward excess. His Legion began taking combat drugs, carrying out perverse experiments, and enjoying ever more debauched activities. The result of all this was when Horus approached Fulgrim to join the rebellion, he did so willingly.

Fulgrim fell into misery after killing his brother Ferrus at Istvaan. He allowed himself to be possessed by the Daemon in his sword but later, somehow, broke free. (Honestly, I hate that piece of lore; I like painting Fulgrim more). In the end, the Lord became an annoying liability for the traitors, frequently attacking worlds to turn the populace into drugs or other horrific things.

The 3rd quit the siege alongside their Primarch and spent their time largely raising Imperial space. Fulgrim hasn’t done anything up till the opening of the Great Rift, and the Lord has done little of military significance. They are passionate monsters. Everything is done for their pleasure and enjoyment, nothing else.

Are the Emperor’s Children still a playable faction?

I play Emperor’s Children in both the Horus Heresy and 40k versions of the game, so… yeah, they are a playable faction.

Of course, when they say “playable,” some gamers are actually referring to whether or not they wreck face as an ultra-competitive tournament list. If that’s what you’re referring to, then my answer is.. probably not much.

I’m no tournament player by any means, but from what I’ve heard through the grapevine, Iron Hands Primaris and Tau are tearing it up on top tables; I haven’t heard that E.C.s have been doing the same.

That said, I do pretty darned well with them in the friendly, narrative-type games I play. They pump out a lot – a lot – of firepower and also hit hard in close combat. New rules for Emperor’s Children recently came out in the Psychic Awakening: Faith and Fury supplement, which gives them additional flavorful options.

Did Emperor Ashoka and Maharani Devi have three children?

Yes, Emperor Ashoka, also known as Ashoka the Great, and Maharani Devi are believed to have had three children. The names of their children were Mahendra, Sanghamitra, and Tivala. According to historical accounts and Buddhist traditions, Mahendra and Sanghamitra played significant roles in spreading Buddhism to Sri Lanka. They are said to have been instrumental in the propagation of Buddhism beyond the Indian subcontinent during Ashoka’s reign.

Are Emperor Ashoka’s first wife Devi and his chief consort Asandhimitra the same?

Nope, they aren’t the same.

Ashoka’s wife, Vedisha Mahadevi Shakya Kumari, used to stay in Ujjain, and she had two children with Ashoka, Mahendra and Sanghmitra, and both turned into monks. She didn’t follow her husband to Patliputra because there stayed his wife and empress consort Asandhimitra, who was of royal birth. She had a proper post and used to get a salary. She also advised the Emperor on state matters. She couldn’t conceive children, so she adopted Charumati, a daughter of Ashoka born from a concubine. Charumati was married to Devapala Kshatriya of Nepal.

Asandhimitra’s death greatly saddened Ashoka, and he made her handmaiden, Tisyarakshita, his chief queen. 🙄

How was the relationship between Emperor Ashoka and Maharani Devi?

Ashoka and Devi were married. Devi was the wife of Ashoka. She was beautiful and wise. Ashoka loved her when he saw her for the first time within Vidisha when he went as the Viceroy. She was the child of a merchant, and Ashoka asked Devi’s father whether she could marry him. Devi was wise. She said that she would marry him if he would end the turbulence within Ujjain peacefully. He said yes to her and then married her. Devi was the beloved of Emperor Ashoka. She was not the chief queen, but she was the mother of his first two children, Mahendra and the lovely Sanghamitra. Devi or Sakyani stayed within Vidisha with her children.

Did Henry Puyi, the last Chinese Emperor, have any children?

According to the biography, his sexual dysfunction has to do with the eunuch.

Rumor has it that he has played certain “games” with the eunuch. I don’t know what “game” the book is referring to. But, there is one detail concerning the fact that he used to pee into their mouth.

Which one of the following is his favorite?

Of course, his nephew attributed his failure of marriage to his ED, not the eunuch.

P.S. Some Quorans cast doubt on my answer, thinking that I might be fabricating the stories of Puyi. So, I have to clarify two points:

  1. As a person who has a very high TOEFL IQ score and has prepared for the GRE argumentation, I’m not so mentally challenged as to make statements in the absence of evidence.

The stories about his homosexual experiences are from a biography from the last eunuch called Sun Yaoting. His original Chinese comment was: “走旱路,不走水路”.

This means dry, which means water. 路 means the road.

If you still can’t figure out the exact meaning of this euphemism, you can refer to my replies in the comments. (I am afraid it might be reported as foul language.)

2. As for your statement, “Speak ill of the dead,” I think everyone is entitled to comment on the historical anecdotes. And I have already mentioned “according to the biography” in my original answer. So, I do not accept this kind of malicious remark on my integrity.

3. You might be thinking too much about the warlords and the CCP, who are too occupied with other, more important affairs to weave rumors about an incompetent puppet who used to be at the mercy of the Japanese.

Next time, remember to pay respect to the living first before showing that to the deceased.

What are the Emperor’s children?

The Emperor’s Children is a fictional Chaos Space Marine Legion in the Warhammer 40,000 universe, which is a tabletop wargame created by Games Workshop. The Emperor’s Children were originally one of the loyalist Space Marine Legions known as the III Legion, but they eventually turned to Chaos during the Horus Heresy, a galaxy-spanning civil war that took place in the background lore of Warhammer 40,000.

The Legion was led by the Primarch Fulgrim, who fell to the temptations of the Chaos god Slaanesh, the Chaos god of excess, pleasure, and perfection. The Emperor’s Children became devoted followers of Slaanesh, embracing a hedonistic and perfectionist lifestyle that often involved seeking sensory indulgence and the pursuit of martial perfection.

As Chaos Space Marines, the Emperor’s Children engage in acts of heresy, corruption, and battle against the forces of the Imperium of Man. They are known for their highly skilled and disciplined warriors, as well as their obsession with personal perfection and aesthetic beauty. The legionnaires often incorporate elaborate and chaotic mutations into their armor and bodies as a result of their devotion to Slaanesh.

What is the plot of the Emperor’s Children?

The plot of The Emperor’s Children in Warhammer 40,000 is primarily set during the Horus Heresy, a major event in the fictional history of the Warhammer 40,000 universe. The Horus Heresy was a galaxy-spanning civil war that took place approximately 10,000 years before the current timeline of Warhammer 40,000.

The Emperor’s Children Legion was originally loyal to the Emperor of Mankind, but their Primarch Fulgrim was corrupted by the Chaos god Slaanesh. Fulgrim’s fall to Chaos led the Emperor’s Children down a dark path, turning them into devoted followers of Slaanesh and ultimately causing them to join Warmaster Horus in his rebellion against the Emperor.

The specific events involving the Emperor’s Children during the Horus Heresy include their descent into chaos, battles against other Space Marine Legions, and their involvement in pivotal conflicts that shaped the outcome of the war. Fulgrim played a significant role in the events, and his personal journey into corruption and excess is a central element of the Emperor’s Children narrative.

It’s important to note that the Warhammer 40,000 lore is extensive and has been expanded upon in various novels, sourcebooks, and other media. The stories of the Emperor’s Children during and after the Horus Heresy continue to evolve in the ongoing narrative of the Warhammer 40,000 universe.

Why are the emperor’s children called that?

The Emperor’s Children are called so because they were originally the III Legion of the Space Marines, created by the Emperor of Mankind during the Great Crusade in the Warhammer 40,000 universe. Each Space Marine Legion was led by a genetically engineered superhuman known as a primarch, and the III Legion’s primarch was named Fulgrim.

The Emperor’s Children were initially a loyalist Legion, serving the Emperor in his quest to reunite the scattered human colonies across the galaxy during the Great Crusade. The name “Emperor’s Children” reflects their status as warriors in the service of the Emperor. However, during the Horus Heresy, Fulgrim, the Primarch of the Emperor’s Children, succumbed to the temptations of Chaos, specifically the Chaos god Slaanesh. This led to the Legion’s fall from grace, and they became devoted followers of Slaanesh, the Prince of Pleasure.

Despite their descent into chaos, the Legion retained its original name, possibly as a dark irony or a reflection of their corrupted origins. The name serves as a reminder of their once noble purpose and their tragic fall from loyalty to the Emperor.

What is the definition of The Emperor’s Children 2024?

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